Canada Bill C-15, An Act respecting the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act:

Gary Anandasangaree is the Member of Parliament for Scarborough – Rouge Park and the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations, the Honourable Carolyn Bennett.

It was my honour to address the House of Commons on the importance of Bill C-15, An Act respecting the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Once passed, Bill C-15 will affirm UNDRIP as a universal human rights instrument with application in Canadian law, and provide the Government of Canada with a framework to work collaboratively with First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples in order to protect, promote and uphold the rights of Indigenous peoples across Canada.

House Government Bill C-15 இங்கே அழுத்தவும் United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act

What We Learned Report BILL C-15

Executive Summary
On December 3, 2020, the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada, with support from the
Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations, introduced Bill C-15, An Act respecting the United Nations Declaration
on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
. Bill C-15 delivers on the Government of Canada’s commitment to introduce
legislation to advance implementation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
(UN Declaration) before the end of 2020. It also responds to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to
Action 43 and 44 and to the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls
(MMIWG) Calls for Justice.
In support of the Government’s commitment to introduce legislation for the implementation of the UN
Declaration, a series of virtual engagement sessions were held over a six-week period between September
30 and November 6, 2020 with First Nations, Inuit and Métis Nation leaders, Modern Treaty signatories,
regional Indigenous organizations, Indigenous women’s organizations and Indigenous youth. The process also
included virtual discussions with natural resource industry sectors and with all provinces and territories.
Discussions with provincial and territorial governments took place within the usual framework of confidentiality
and details of these discussions are not covered in this report.
In total, over 70 virtual sessions took place. The primary objective of the sessions was to seek feedback and
advice on potential enhancements to a consultation draft of legislative text based on former Private Member’s
Bill (PMB) C-262
.
The consultation draft included minor technical changes to former PMB C-262 for
consideration.
Throughout the engagements, participants were invited to submit written feedback via a generic inbox
managed by Justice Canada. While much of the feedback received included specific recommendations on the
text of the consultation draft, participants also used the opportunity to share their views and recommendations
on the development of an action plan. Over 50 written submissions with proposed recommendations on the
consultation draft were received during the process. The majority of the submissions were from Indigenous
peoples’ organizations.
In general, there was strong support for the UN Declaration and the Government’s intention and efforts to
implement it in Canada. However, many involved in the engagements and discussions expressed concerns
about the process, mainly with respect to the limited timeframe to review and provide meaningful comments on
the consultation draft, as well as the desire for a more in-depth and inclusive process.

முழுதாக படிப்பதற்கு இங்கே அழுத்தவும்

Information from .justice.gc.ca

error: Content is protected !!உள்ளடக்கம் பாதுகாக்கப்படுகிறது!!